Things Come From Emptiness
Tao-Te-Ching, Lao-Tzu


FROM EMPTINESS


Growth is to develop flexibly under a given environment, a beauty of life I have explored. Observing the cactus’s thorns as a symbol of growth, I intentionally bent and twisted my work during firing. Like my work, 

I experienced many changes under a limited environment while taking my master's in the UK during the pandemic. The deprivation of daily life made me interested in what I regarded as repetitive, somewhat boring, and ordinary. Vessels are the object I am newly drawn to. Vessels are everywhere, so I had no particular interest in vessels. During the pandemic period, I spent most of my time in my room, drawing artefacts on museum websites. I gradually enjoyed observing vessels in detail and imagining how vessels were created. I realized that a change of perspective could make daily life more enjoyable and abundant. Vessels, for me, symbolize daily life. I explore vessels from various angles. I divide one piece into two pieces and make pieces seemingly balanced or unbalanced. From observation points, my works cross an ambiguous boundary between daily objects and art objects. Such ambiguity in my work can bring various and flexible interpretations, and these interpretations could evoke inspiration in daily life.


I create works with white porcelain and hand-building. I repeatedly stack coils and press the surface, feeling my work with my hands. Rather than trimming the surface, I leave handprints on the surface as a trace of the making processes. Having worked with white porcelain so far, I recently develop unique porcelain mixed with black powder to emphasize my works within a vague boundary. I try to expand my expression, using the clay made on my own.


FROM EMPTINESS


Growth is to develop flexibly under a given environment, a beauty of life I have explored. Observing the cactus’s thorns as a symbol of growth, I intentionally bent and twisted my work during firing. Like my work, I experienced many changes under a limited environment while taking my master's in the UK during the pandemic. The deprivation of daily life made me interested in what I regarded as repetitive, somewhat boring, and ordinary. Vessels are the object I am newly drawn to. Vessels are everywhere, so I had no particular interest in vessels. During the pandemic period, I spent most of my time in my room, drawing artefacts on museum websites. I gradually enjoyed observing vessels in detail and imagining how vessels were created. I realized that a change of perspective could make daily life more enjoyable and abundant. Vessels, for me, symbolize daily life. I explore vessels from various angles. I divide one piece into two pieces and make pieces seemingly balanced or unbalanced. From observation points, my works cross an ambiguous boundary between daily objects and art objects. Such ambiguity in my work can bring various and flexible interpretations, and these interpretations could evoke inspiration in daily life.


I create works with white porcelain and hand-building. I repeatedly stack coils and press the surface, feeling my work with my hands. Rather than trimming the surface, I leave handprints on the surface as a trace of the making processes. Having worked with white porcelain so far, I recently develop unique porcelain mixed with black powder to emphasize my works within a vague boundary. I try to expand my expression, using the clay made on my own.

OTHER WORKS